Prevalence of premenstrual dysphoric disorder among high school girls of Gadag district, Karnataka, india- a school-based cross-sectional study

Authors

  • Nitin O Pattanashetty Assistant professor, Department of Psychiatry, JGM Medical College. Hubli
  • Jitendra Mugali Jitendra mugali, Associate professor Gadag institute of medical sciences, Gadag
  • Niharika HS Intern, Department of Psychiatry, GIMS, Gadag

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.30834/KJP.34.2.2021.273

Keywords:

Premenstrual dysphoric disorder, Premenstrual syndrome, Adolescent

Abstract

Background: Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) has consequences on behaviour, cognitive abilities, mental health status, academic performance, and overall quality of life. The study examined the prevalence of premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) among high school going girls of Gadag. Methods: A school-based cross-sectional study was conducted among 900 high school going girls aged 12-16 years from government and private schools of Gadag district. The data was collected using a pre-tested semi-structured questionnaire. The proforma included socio-demographic profile and symptoms related to PMDD. A detailed history was obtained from parents and teachers. Data were analysed using coGuide software, V.1.03 and the p-value was set at < 0.05. Results: In the present study, the prevalence of PMDD was 4.89%. Out of 900 girls, 650(70%) were studying in 9th and 10th standard. Forty-four students were diagnosed with PMDD, out of which 14 (4.32%) were aged 14years, 17 (4.89%) were in 9th St, 30 (4.3%) belonged to English medium, and the majority, 39 (10.1%), were Hindus.  Hindu religion was found to be significantly associated with PMDD (P-value of <0.001). No significant difference in PMDD was seen with age (p-value 0.325), the standard of studying (P-value of 0.948), and medium of instruction (P-value of 0.123). Conclusion: The magnitude of PMDD, according to this study, is 4.89%, and the menstrual health of young schoolgirls, particularly those in the age group 12 to 16 years, needs significant public health attention.

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Published

2021-09-04

How to Cite

Nitin O Pattanashetty, Mugali, J., & Niharika HS. (2021). Prevalence of premenstrual dysphoric disorder among high school girls of Gadag district, Karnataka, india- a school-based cross-sectional study. Kerala Journal of Psychiatry. https://doi.org/10.30834/KJP.34.2.2021.273

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Section

Research Report